Frequently Asked Questions

What is a Scholé Group?
Scholé Groups are homeschooling co-ops that employ the content of a classical curriculum and pursue restfulness in learning. Learn more about these distinctives here.

What is the pricing structure of Scholé Groups?
There is no cost to join the Scholé Group Network and gain access to the resources and benefits provided to Scholé Groups. Once a group has been founded, the group director establishes an individualized pricing structure that best suits their co-op’s specific needs. That is, the director may run the group on a volunteer basis or may choose to charge tuition, rent a facility, hire teachers etc. The Scholé Groups Network no longer charges a per-student fees.

How is the Scholé Groups Network funded?
Scholé Groups is a division of Classical Academic Press. Because there is no charge to join the Scholé Groups Network, Scholé Groups is funded by other Classical Academic Press enterprises.

What is scholé?
The word scholé (pronounced skoh-LAY) comes from a Greek word meaning “restful learning,” with connotations of reflection, contemplation, and leisure.

As our name implies, we at Scholé Groups value learning that is restful rather than frenetic. How do our educational philosophy and methods differ from those represented by progressive education? Modern education is largely an education in anxiety. In this system, students commonly take eight or more courses at a time, which contributes to the stress and anxiety now associated with the term “student.” For each of their classes students are typically graded numerically by teachers who are often driven to “teach to the test” and who must use assessments that produce easily quantified data—in other words, dehumanizing tests that are machine readable. Students in such a system learn to cram, pass, and then forget.

By contrast, Scholé Groups seek to cultivate un-rushed learning with meaningful, deep engagement of fewer books and concepts (comparatively speaking), so that learning becomes memorable, enjoyable, and permanent. Scholé Groups seek to create an atmosphere of restful learning by modeling peace, tranquility, love of the subject, and they value methods of evaluation that assess understanding and mastery of the subject rather than just the input and output of facts.

This means that in their various settings, Scholé Groups work to create engaged discussion and learning and seek to build relationships among student and adult learners. Scholé Groups work hard to structure their courses so that the amount of work required is in accord with the allotted time while an atmosphere of contemplation, conversation, and reflection is also cultivated. Our groups seek to wed truth to beauty in their teaching and to cultivate education in its fullest sense, so that students will receive excellent, classical instruction that leads to wisdom and mastery.

If you are interested in exploring the concept of scholé in more depth, we recommend these resources to you.

What is liturgical learning?
Liturgical Learning is a phrase that describes the use of the embodied patterns from church worship and tradition for shaping the way we order time, space, and language in our schools and homeschools.

Using a liturgical pattern within your group meetings and classes is an effective way to recover reflection and contemplation as part of learning. For example, one could aspects of a typical “order of worship” as a pattern for ordering a lesson:

  • Welcome/Greeting: 3 minutes (students greeted by beautiful images and music, possibly with a inspirational quotation or key question; 3 minutes of contemplation before official start)
  • Grateful Acknowledgment: 2 minutes (of the art, one another, the opportunity to study some aspect of God’s creation, the mind, nature, humanity)
  • Confess What We Need: 2 minutes (disposition, frame of mind, virtue, heart that seeks and calls out for wisdom; a written confession can be read and/or prayer offered); key Scripture: Proverbs 2:1-7
  • Teach/Present/Discuss: 30-45 minutes (traditional lesson, led by the teacher, ensuring that all students are engaged and participating)
  • Confess What We Know/Have Learned: 2 minutes (summary and review taking the form of “creedal” confession that edifies)
  • Expression of Thanksgiving: 2-3 minutes (led by teacher or mature student, but giving opportunity for all students to express gratitude to God, teacher, other students)
  • Benediction/Dismissal: 1 minute (prepared benediction written by teacher, or from traditional sources)
  • Processional: 3 minutes (return to beautiful music and images; students free to leave immediately or remain for quiet contemplation)

Please note: this pattern includes many elements of liturgy that you may wish to implement within a given class. However, Liturgical Learning will vary in style and length according to your group’s specific composition. This pattern serves as one example of what Liturgical Learning could look like, but you should feel free to cohere to or depart from this specific sequence as you see fit.

Can my family comprise a Scholé Group?
Scholé Groups are communal in essence, and so we require at least three participating families to come together to form a group. However, even if you do not wish to form a Scholé Group, we certainly recommend incorporating the scholé philosophy into your personal homeschool.

What course of study is required for Scholé Groups?
Scholé Groups are committed to a classical course of studies, a path that has been tried and proven since ancient times. The long tradition of classical education has emphasized the seeking after of truth, goodness, and beauty and the study of the liberal arts and the great books. A classical education should be like a stroll through a garden of delight. As with any good walk, there may be digressions, but the main path—the key spots and visitations—should be known. Scholé Groups follow a core sequence of studies (see below), which includes Latin, logic, writing, and rhetoric as well as the great books, mathematics, and science. Because each Scholé Group is unique in its setting and composition, we encourage our groups to structure their community time according to the specific needs and goals of their co-op, focusing on certain areas of study together and others individually in their homes. For example, a group could choose to offer Latin and Great Books during their co-op meetings, and each individual family would pursue the other core studies individually within the home. Likewise, we encourage each group to use whichever tools and published resources they find most fitting and helpful.

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What classes should I offer in my Scholé Group?
This will depend largely on the setting of your group and your group’s preferences. We encourage Scholé Groups to take advantage of the resources present in their group. For example, you might like to take advantage of the group dynamic to study literature, a study that thrives on discussion. Alternatively, you might wish to offer a class based on a particular teaching resource in your midst, such as a parent who is an artist or a musician (or a physicist!). Ultimately, the Scholé Group director or leadership team determines which classes the Scholé Group will offer.

How often do Scholé Groups meet?
Scholé Groups gather to meet on a regular basis. Most Scholé Groups meet weekly, though we have some groups that meet up to three days per week and others who meet only twice per month.

What size are Scholé Groups?
Scholé Groups range significantly in size. Some prefer to maintain a small community, while other like to expand. If you are just launching a co-op, we recommend starting with a smaller group. This will allow you to focus on the pedagogy and practices that will shape your community first, before taking on some of the logistics that come with a larger group.

How do I start a Scholé Group?
We’re so glad you asked! Here’s a page that will walk you through the steps we recommend.

How do I operate a Scholé Group?
The flexibility of Scholé Groups means that this is ultimately up to you! The operational aspects of your Scholé Group will vary greatly depending on the size and scope of your co-op, but if you’re looking for guidance based on these factors, you can find our recommendations in the Scholé Groups Handbook. The network of Scholé Groups across the country is also an excellent resource for finding best practices that suit your style. Connect with other groups like yours on our forums, on our Facebook group, through our webinars, or through shared documents in our File Library!

Do you provide structural and/or curricular recommendations/guidance for Scholé Groups?
We do! We are developing a curriculum guide for just this purpose. In the mean time, we recommend using the Ambrose Curriculum Guide as a tool. This is a comprehensive K–12 curriculum guide developed over many years by one of the veteran schools leading the renewal of classical education across the United States. The full Ambrose Curriculum Guide is available to subscribers of ClassicalU.com. View samples here.

What are the benefits of starting or joining a Scholé Group?
The concept of scholé cuts across the grain of modern education and therefore takes a principled commitment to the ideal in order to be implemented and realized. We provide each Scholé Group with a variety of educational and practical resources for understanding and implementing scholé in their communities. Our resources include support for group leaders, parents and teachers, and students. Discover our collection of resources and benefits here.

What is a Beta Scholé Group?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During our inaugural year, the 2015-16 academic year, twenty-two homeschooling communities joined us as Pilot Scholé Groups. These groups forged the path as we built benefits and resources to support them as their needs arose. We are excited about what the 2016-17 academic year holds for Scholé Groups as we continue to develop a robust program of support. We are growing to fifty Beta Scholé Groups who will enjoy all of our benefits and resources at the discounted price of $25 per student. To learn more about our plans for the coming year, see Dr. Perrin’s article: “The Year 2016: From Pilot Scholé Groups to Beta Scholé Groups.”

 

 

 

What are the benefits of being a Scholé Group?

 

 

As a Scholé Group, you’ll have a multitude of benefits and resources to support you as you develop and grow. Educate your parents with an introduction to scholé, equip your teachers through ClassicalU, and support your community with curriculum guides, interactive homework practice, discounted texts, and more. See our full list of benefits here.

 

When does my group start receiving the resources and benefits of being a Scholé Group (e.g., access to ClassicalU)?

First, you must apply to be a Scholé Group. Once your application has been accepted and your group has been approved, you will be asked to make a nonrefundable $200 deposit indicating your commitment. (This deposit will be applied against your tuition bill, which is due with your group roster in September.) As soon as we receive and process your deposit, your group will be given access to all the benefits, resources, and support provided to Scholé Groups. These features will remain active until the following May, at which point you will be given the opportunity to renew your commitment to Scholé Groups.

 

What is the cost of being a Scholé Group?

The Scholé Groups Network is funded by one simple method: an annual fee for each student in each Scholé Group. These annual fees fund the services and support we offer to Scholé Groups, including webinars, ClassicalU teacher training, discounted Scholé Academy online courses, a group website, staff support, and much more.

The annual fee per student is $100. (Note: during our beta year [2016-17 academic year] the annual fee per student is $25.) After a group has submitted an application and been approved by our team, the group will be asked to make a nonrefundable $200 deposit, which will be applied toward their tuition bill in September. After this deposit has been collected, groups will immediately be given access to all of the resources and benefits offered to Scholé Groups.

 

How does the Scholé Groups pricing structure work? Is the per-student fee the same as tuition?

 

We charge each Scholé Group a fee based on the number of students in the group (for our Beta Year, the rate is discounted at $25 per student). Our pricing model takes the number of students in a group into account as a measurement of the size of the group, but we do not collect this fee from each family in the group. Instead, the group director submits a total fee according to the size of the group (measured by number of students). This total fee funds the entire collection of resources made available to Scholé Groups, including those resources that benefit group directors and teachers (e.g., ClassicalU and training webinars), those that benefit families (e.g., discounts on CAP products and Scholé Academy courses, and a website), and those that benefit classes and students directly (e.g., curriculum guides, shared classroom resources, and HeadventureLand). In other words, the fee submitted by your group to the Scholé Groups Network funds the resources that holistically benefit your Scholé Group.

The directors of each group have the freedom to determine the pricing model for their group. That is, directors may charge tuition per student, per family, per class, or by any other measurement they deem wise. Groups vary greatly in size and structure, and we wish each group to find and utilize the pricing structure that suits them best. For example, a group that spans many grade levels may wish to charge different tuition rates for different grade levels. A group with many class offerings within one grade level, on the other hand, may wish to charge according to which and how many classes a student is taking. We recommend marketing your group to interested families according to the pricing structure chosen by your group (which will, in some way, include the per-student fee collected by the Scholé Groups Network, but which may not correspond directly with that fee).

 

 

Can a Classical Conversations community also be a Scholé Group?

 

 

Yes, a Classical Conversations (CC) community can become a Scholé Group—or a Scholé Group could decide to become a CC community. Since the Scholé Groups Network does not stipulate which published materials are used, a Scholé Group could decide to also become a CC community and use the required CC materials. Scholé Groups are required to educate students according to a classical sequence of liberal arts (but not particular publications), but that is satisfied by the required CC curriculum, so there is no conflict.

However, we think that for most people it will be unrealistic to participate and support two homeschooling communities at the same time. It may be roughly analogous to trying to participate in two churches at once! Some families are able to do this, but not many. We do not permit one person to be the director of both a CC community and a Scholé Group simultaneously.

We greatly admire the work of Classical Conversations and are in debt to the great contribution CC has made in the renewal of home-centered, classical education. While we at Scholé Groups offer a pedagogical approach that may vary from CC at points, we are enthusiastic supporters of the CC work and ministry. You can learn more about Classical Conversations here.

 

 

How do I start a Scholé Group?

 

Scholé Groups are springing up across the country. Visit Find a Group Near You to see if there is already a group in your area!

If you are interested in starting your own Scholé Group, we recommend that you read our Introductory Guide to Scholé Groups. A more detailed sequence of steps to starting a Scholé Group is given on our Start a Scholé Group page.

 

How do I name my Scholé Group?

You have flexibility regarding how you name your Scholé Group, so long as you include the word “scholé” in your group name or subtitle. Here are some examples:

  • Scholé Homeschool Center of Harrisburg
  • Harrisburg Scholé Community
  • Scholé Group of Harrisburg
  • Harrisburg Scholé Center
  • Harrisburg Homeschooling Center: A Scholé Learning Group

 

How do I operate a Scholé Group?

Upon receipt of your deposit by the Scholé Groups Network, your Scholé Group will be given access to all of the benefits and resources made available to Scholé Groups, including the comprehensive Scholé Groups Handbook. The Handbook provides extensive information on how to operate a Scholé Group—including the philosophical, pedagogical, and practical elements.

The Scholé Groups Network also provides a number of platforms for conversation and collaboration between groups, so that group leaders across the nation can learn from one another and grow together, including:

  • Monthly Directors’ Meetings: We host “Coffee & Conversation” meetings each month. These are live video conference meetings in which directors of Scholé Groups gather to share with and encourage one another, and they are an excellent resource for new directors learning how to operate a group.
  • The Resource Library: This is an ever-growing collection of files used and shared by Scholé Group directors. The Resource Library includes planning material, worksheets, forms, etc., that are available for directors to download, customize, and use in their own Scholé Groups. No need to reinvent the wheel if there’s already a great resource out there!
  • The Director’s Forum: In addition to our General Forum, which is available to Scholé Explorers and members of Scholé Groups, ScholeGroups.com also has a Director’s Forum, made available only to the directors of Scholé Groups. Raise questions and benefit from the years of experience of our seasoned group leaders.
  • Facebook: We have a private Facebook group on which members and directors of Scholé Groups share photos and links with one another. See what other groups are up to and get inspired!

 

What is Liturgical Learning?

 

Liturgical Learning is a phrase that describes the use of the embodied patterns from church worship and tradition for shaping the way we order time, space, and language in our schools and homeschools. Using a liturgical pattern within your group meetings and classes is an effective way to recover reflection and contemplation as part of learning. For example, one could use a typical “order of worship” as a pattern for ordering a lesson:

  • Welcome/Greeting: 3 minutes (students greeted by beautiful images and music, possibly with a inspirational quotation or key question; 3 minutes of contemplation before official start)
  • Grateful Acknowledgment: 2 minutes (of the art, one another, the opportunity to study some aspect of God’s creation, the mind, nature, humanity)
  • Confess What We Need: 2 minutes (disposition, frame of mind, virtue, heart that seeks and calls out for wisdom; a written confession can be read and/or prayer offered); key Scripture: Proverbs 2:1-7
  • Teach/Present/Discuss: 30-45 minutes (traditional lesson, led by the teacher, ensuring that all students are engaged and participating)
  • Confess What We Know/Have Learned: 2 minutes (summary and review taking the form of “creedal” confession that edifies)
  • Expression of Thanksgiving: 2-3 minutes (led by teacher or mature student, but giving opportunity for all students to express gratitude to God, teacher, other students)
  • Benediction/Dismissal: 1 minute (prepared benediction written by teacher, or from traditional sources)
  • Processional: 3 minutes (return to beautiful music and images; students free to leave immediately or remain for quiet contemplation)

Please note: this pattern includes many elements of liturgy that you may wish to implement within a given class. However, Liturgical Learning will vary in style and length according to your group’s specific composition. This pattern serves as one example of what Liturgical Learning could look like, but you should feel free to cohere to or depart from this specific sequence as you see fit.

Resources: For more information about Liturgical Learning, see the following:

  • Book: Desiring the Kingdom by James K. A. Smith
  • Book: The Liberal Arts Tradition: The Philosophy of Christian Classical Education by Ravi Jain and Kevin Clark
  • “Learning and Leisure: Developing a School of Scholé” (Christopher Perrin on InsideClassicalEd.com)
  • “Desiring a Kingdom School” (Christopher Perrin on InsideClassicalEd.com)
  • Listen to the audio seminar “The Liturgical Classroom and Virtue Formation” (by Jenny Rallens) here.

 

 

How do I type the accent in scholé?

We’re glad you asked! It’s actually not too difficult.

On a Mac:

  1. Hold down “option” plus “e,” release, then type “e” OR
  2. hold down the “e” key and type “2” when the accent options appear

On a PC:

  1. hold down the ALT key and type “0233” OR
  2. copy and paste “é”

 

 

 

I am currently part of a Pilot Scholé Group. What will the transition to Beta Scholé Groups look like for me?

 

Groups who joined us for the 2015-16 academic year, our Pilot Scholé Groups, will continue to enjoy full access to all benefits and resources throughout this academic year. In June of 2016, Pilot Scholé Groups will be given the opportunity to renew as Beta Scholé Groups for the 2016-17 academic year.

 

Are young children considered ||students|| in the $25/student pricing structure?

With regard to the $25/student pricing structure, we consider “students” to be children K–12. Many co-ops offer pre-K classes or childcare. We think this is a great opportunity to encourage play and exploration in young students but do not charge $25 for these children.

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